Ten Ways to Reduce Delays in Processing Purchase Requisitions

  1. Make sure that appropriate funds are available before submitting a requisition.
  2. Make sure that the PAC requisition is created with enough money to cover expenses, freight, maintenance, etc.
  3. Make sure that requests for procurement against contract or grant funds are submitted well in advance of the funds expiration date, 90 days prior to the expiration date for equipment purchases.
  4. Make sure you provide a detailed description and specification for the product or service you want to buy.
  5. Provide a complete set of specifications, drawings, samples, special instructions, are submitted with your request for a competitive bid.
  6. Complete the sole source justification form for non-competitive bid products and services that are unique, designated to match existing, etc. 
  7. Submit all supporting documentation, quotes, proposals, pre-hire worksheets, drawings etc., the same day that you submit your requisition. 
  8. Request insurance waivers before you submit your requisitions.
  9. Speak with the Risk Manager or bring any risk management issues to the attention of the Buyer immediately.
  10. Obtain approvals for items that require them before you submit your requisition:
    • Air conditioning units
    • Alcohol
    • After-the-fact requests
    • Communications systems
    • Conflict of Interest request
    • Hiring UC employees
    • Narcotics, dangerous drugs, drugs for research, controlled substances
    • Firearms, ammunition
    • Gifts, flowers, fruit or mementos outside the limits and guidelines defined in UC Finance Bulletin G-41
    • Parties for academic and non-academic staff, including retirees, in conflict with the guidelines of UC Finance Bulletin BUS-79
    • Outside legal services
    • Radioactive isotopes
    • Fume hoods
    • Lasers, X-ray and safety equipment
    • Building services (FSR request)
    • Postal materials and services
    • Vehicles
    • Events (facilities use agreements)
    • Travel
    • Use of UCLA names, seals, trademarks